Tag Archives: reflection

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Small Group Priority: Time.

Categories: Ministry Tips, Small Groups, Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

The human heart was never intended to do intimacy in microwave fashion. When relationships are required to operate in excessive megahertz there are usually excessive mega-hurts! Look around and see the fallout of lives where taking time was not priority.

We live in a microwave, fast lane, express culture where ‘blur’ is the natural perspective and ‘rush’ the natural rhythm of life. In this vortex of activity, money has been replaced by time as the principle premium commodity of value. Whoever said Rome wasn’t built in a day didn’t live in the 21st century where ‘fast’ is the new ‘slow’ and innovation lags behind invention!

We actually have been conditioned to believe that we can actually do all things in the shortest period of time possible. But while industry thrives on production in less time, intimacy never will. The human heart was never intended to do intimacy in microwave fashion. When relationships are required to operate in excessive megahertz there are usually excessive mega-hurts! Look around and see the fallout of lives where taking time was not priority.

Churches can sometimes be notorious in reflecting the culture too much and reinforcing the chaotic rhythms of life to the beat of a manic metronome. One of the best gifts we can give to each other is time — time to process the groanings of our heart; time to hear and be heard; time to care and be cared for. Time to hear the voice of God and actually deal with the “now what” of it rather than the “what’s next?” It only takes a few moments to absorb content into the mind, but it takes time to apply the intent of that content to the soul.

Dynamic, transformational small groups discourage and outlaw a “drive-thru” Christianity and favor more a “drive-in and park” environment. They give and take time to hear the whisper of the still small voice of God as well as the murmurs of the hearts in response to that Word as they all bring their chaos-riddled lives to it. Honoring time gives everyone in the group time to better “know and be known” with the understanding that such revelations gained can stabilize one’s life when they reengage the frenzy of real world obligations.

Practicing this healthy priority can be expressed in several ways.

First, avoid the trap of responding to each other in Bible studies with only answers to the questions on the page. Take time to read between the lines by seeking to discuss how the truths they encountered impact real life…their real life. In my small group, when I take the husbands into another room after our group has studied together, I start off by asking the question, “How does what we have just studied and discussed affect us as fathers, husbands and men?” Small groups must consecrate time during the study to allow for the ‘rubber to hit the road.’ This is one of the ways Scripture can be experienced as the Living Word of God for life.

Second, do not allow your formal meetings to be the exclusive venue of interaction. So much of life happens in the informal and in-between gatherings. For our group, periodically we will schedule breakfasts, lunches, or game nights where we hang out and bear down on whatever comes up. These times are especially effective in creating friendship and community where there is no other agenda than that.Keep in mind that this does not mean that all members need to attend. As long as there is at least one other person, time can be well spent if the goal is developing deeper friendship.

Third, observe a combination of the previous 2. Use informal, in between times to follow-up on things said and discovered during the formal gathering. In this way people can know that they have been heard and that what they said really mattered. This can happen at a restaurant, bowling alley, or coffee shop but can also take place on the phone or via email (though probably not Facebook!) The point here is to take time to connect with one another’s hearts and minds in a way that fosters friendship.

Individual Christ-follower: are you taking the initiative to connect with a member of your group outside of the group meeting times in meaningful ways? Don’t wait for the leader to do this for you. Step up and out and make time for a group member!

Small Group Leader: are you encouraging and facilitating times for your members to be together in significant ways? Have you considered using one of your times you study the Bible as opportunities to “study one another”?

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The “Flawed Scribe”

Categories: Devotional Insights, Tags: , ,

“Flawed Scribe” is my upfront admission of my being an imperfect but in-process pilgrim whose musings and insights, though sincere, are reflective of the journey I am still a student in.

I find that people (me included) give the disclaimer that we aren’t perfect and that we’re all in process but it does seem that we actually do assume a significant level of expertise with our views. I mean, look at the heat and vigor with which we communicate and unconsciously expect to be heard and heeded. That is “flawed” because no matter the issue, we are incapable of seeing it from all the angles AND with perfect flaw-free clarity. Only One can make that claim for He is also the One who shapes reality and perspective. When it comes to the issues of life, including those of my own, I am definitely 20/20 challenged.

I am reading through the book of Job, in the Bible. I think this assumption of “flaw-free clarity” was Job’s problem in his understandable reaction to the incalculable suffering he was afflicted with along with the insufferable “comforters” he had for friends. (They really did try to help but they were clueless malpracticioners of soul-care). Job dared to assert that in his own righteousness, he had the right and intention to confront God and expect an answer. Larry Crabb in his book, Inside Out (great book) refers to the “Sin of Demandingness” and that this cute little companion already has real estate in our hearts, lurking in close proximity to our own sense of justice and fair play. It usually rears its attractive head with calm ferocity whe we face adversity or deprivation. It is when we are going without, being left out, being opposed or oppressed that we demand, even to God, our list of grievances be heard and resolved. The amazing thing is that we are not even aware of the presence of this self-righteous roommate, closer to us than our own skin.

Personally, I am going through some challenges in my own life and I have come to understand painfully, humbly, that although I have been given some wisdom, that due to my “flawed” nature, I must be careful not even to count on that apart from an absolute reliance and dependence of the One who is fully, truly all-knowing and all-wise. I am a flawed scribe because even in the face of the reality of Jesus Christ, The Way, TRUTH and life, I still find myself opposing His wisdom in favor of my own.

Indeed, I am a scribe in that I think, read, muse, ponder and then communicate through writing, musical compositions (makes me more of a bard here) and also counseling, guiding, encouraging, and teaching/preaching to others. I am flawed in that, inherently, I am broken and in the process of being fixed. My musings are always tainted with the fact that I do not see as God does, and quite frankly, never will, not even, I believe, in eternity, since I will never BE God. But that’s OK…God is already doing a great job being God and I trust Him….I mean, I am learning to trust Him. (Oooops, I did it again!)

So as far as your sampling my philosophical emanations, enter and partake at your own risk, but with eyes wide open, recognizing who you’re dealing with: a piece of clay on the wheel being molded to become something of far greater worth in the future than he is right now.

My hope is in this passage of Scripture, which is also a promise:

“…being confident of this, that He who began a good in you will carry it on to completion until the day of Christ.” (Philippians 1:6)

May it be true of me and you as well.

Bon Voyage!

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Scripture Meditation: “Savoring True Soul Food”

Categories: Spiritual Disciplines, Spiritual Formation, Tags: , , , , , , ,

Frankly, meditating on Scripture is one of my favorite topics and disciplines. Though I have been doing this for over 40 years, I still consider myself a student who has neither yet perfected nor reaped the full benefit of this timeworn discipline and, in a manner, art.

Oven Fried Chicken by mooshee85

Transform Thought:

Frankly, meditating on Scripture is one of my favorite topics and disciplines. Though I have been doing this for over 40 years, I still consider myself a student who has neither yet perfected nor reaped the full benefit of this timeworn discipline and, in a manner, art. Let’s be clear: when I speak of meditation, I am not referring to the Eastern discipline of “emptying your mind” but actually of purifying and satisfying your mind and soul by filling it with divine content.

One of the clearest descriptions of meditation is “focused thinking”. Scripture meditation, therefore, is focused thinking on and about the Word of God where the intention is for us to understand and apply revealed truths to our lives in humble response to God. The rewards include a greater understanding of Scripture, increased sense of personal well being, a more satisfying communion with God, and a transformed life as it is being conformed to the character and purpose of Jesus Christ. These alone provide exciting incentives to make it a discipline to feast on.  In Scripture meditation, thinking nice thoughts is not the goal. Living in true fellowship with God and others is. Look at what the psalmist says about one who meditates on the Word of God:

He is like a tree planted by streams of water,
which yields its fruit in season
and whose leaf does not wither.
Whatever he does prospers.  Psalm  1:3

When someone tells me that they can’t meditate, I have learned to ask them if they have ever worried. When they answer that they have, I tell them that if they can worry, they can meditate! Worry is focused thinking on problems or circumstances in such a way that affects your mind and heart and, eventually, your behavior. Scripture meditation happens when a student of the Scripture, humble and open, takes the time, to come to the Word of God and engages it with their mind and heart as they read and study for the purpose of deeper fellowship with God and nourishment to their soul. Meditation enables Scripture to become the true soul food.

My daughter, Christine, and I were working through a meditation exercise using Scripture when toward the end of it, she read an instructional guide for Scripture meditation from one of the “help” pages in her Quest Study Bible published by Zondervan. I reviewed it and exclaimed to her that it was one of the clearest, most helpful, simple, yet profound explanations I had heard encountered.

“How Does a Person Meditate on God’s Word?

Meditation [on Scripture] is a combination of reviewing, repeating, reflecting, thinking, analyzing, feeling and even enjoying. It is a physical, intellectual and emotional activity-it involves our whole being.

In some ways meditation doesn’t easily fit into the Western culture. We value action and busyness more than stopping and considering. The author of this psalm was from another time and culture, one with a tradition that valued meditation. As a result, meditation came more naturally for him and others with his Middle Eastern background. We have to overcome some cultural obstacles to learn to meditate.

I especially loved the context clarifying the distinction between the Western and Eastern mindset as the pilgrim approaches meditation. In my opinion, the Eastern avenue seems to open up windows and doors for heart and mind of the Christian pilgrim to embrace more of the mind and heart of God, the mysteries of His infinite fullness. Our traditional, formulaic ways, usually, restricted and hindered by time, space and inner preoccupations, result in a more cerebral, lifeless, approach and result! But that’s for another day, another blog so…

I do know, however, that due to our cultural conditioning and predispositions against stillness, many would legitimately admit that they do not know how to meditate. One blog post won’t cure that (omen of more posts to come on this topic) but I have included here the brief article here from the Quest Bible along with their list of meditation techniques. I threw in a few of my own.

Transform Tips:

There are a variety of ways to meditate on God’s Word. Techniques include:

  1. Avoid just diving into the task before asking God for insight; prepare your mind and heart to receive it.
  2. *Take time to read a verse or passage over and over.
  3. *Begin to memorize all or part of it.
  4. Take note of the main characters, descriptions, actions, cause-and-effects, in the passage.
  5. Define, clarify, ponder special words or phrases
  6. *Listen! Quiet your hearts to allow the Holy Spirit to speak to you through God’s Word.
  7. *Consider how it fits with the rest of the Bible and life in general.
  8. *Become emotionally involved-allow yourself to feel what God feels, his desires expressed through his words period
  9. Write down your thoughts, insights, questions, responses to the passage
  10. *Move from meditation to application-connect your thoughts to action. Consider how the truth and power of the Word of God should affect your behavior.
*(Taken also from the Quest Study Bible article)

Remember, it’s actually putting into practice these and other techniques that facilitates spiritual nourishment as you feast on the wonders of His Word . I hope this article helps you to see the Bible as an invitation to that banquet table of divine revelation that can satisfy your mind and soul as you partake of and savor the fulfilling and delightful delicacies of the riches and depths of God waiting for you in His Word, the Holy Scriptures.

Bon apetit!